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Dairy Free Gravy Without Drippings

This dairy free gravy is made without drippings but is full of rich flavor. It is very easy to make and is perfect for family and holiday dinners.

Dairy free gravy in a glass gravy boat on a white marble counter

The main time of year I make gravy is Thanksgiving. Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday and pull out all of the stops for it from the dairy free turkey to the dairy free pumpkin pie.

However, sometimes I just want some gravy with my dairy free mashed potatoes to go with my fried chicken without buttermilk and don’t want to bother with drippings.

When that happens, this is my go to recipe!

WHAT TYPE OF STOCK TO USE

Generally, the type of gravy depends on the type what meat or poultry you roasted because it is made from the incredibly flavorful pan drippings.

Likewise, you’d use the same type of stock. If you’re using the gravy over beef you use a beef stock and a chicken gravy would call for a chicken stock.

For turkey gravy, you can use chicken stock instead of turkey stock if that is what you have on hand or is easy for you to get.

The color of the gravy will greatly depend on the color of the stock. Chicken and turkey stock are lighter than beef stock.

Some feel beef gravy has better color while chicken gravy has better flavor. If you want the best of both worlds, use half beef gravy and half chicken gravy.

For a vegetarian stock, you can use mushroom stock which is full of savory flavor.

BULLION POWDER AND CUBES

Bullion powder and bullion cubes work fine for making stock.

In addition to beef and chicken bullion, there vegetarian bullion powders that can work here as well. 

Mushroom or onion bullion powder works well with beef where vegetable stock and vegetarian chicken stock are good for chicken and turkey.

I always have onion bullion powder and vegetarian chicken bullion powder on hand because they are common in Israeli kitchens. So, I’ve used them often in recipes, including gravy, instead of stock.

STOCK VS WATER

I personally like using stock because it adds flavor. However, it is not uncommon for people to use water to make gravy.

WHY USE FLOUR TO THICKEN GRAVY

I use flour to thicken gravy because it gives the gravy that classic opaque slightly pail look.

Many people don’t like using flour because if it isn’t cooked long enough, it can give a floury flavor to the gravy. Also, if not made properly it can become clumpy.

The Good news is, making a smooth creamy gravy is a snap if you turn it into a roux first.

Another benefit some people see with gravy made with flour is that it keeps better in the fridge. This means it can be made ahead of time or use up leftovers.

WHY USE STARCH TO THICKEN GRAVY

Both corn starch and potato starch can be used to make a gravy.

Gravy made with starch is considered by many to have a silkier texture than gravy made with flour.

This option is perfect for anyone who is gluten-free (make sure the package is marked gluten-free).

Just like with the gravy made using flour needs a roux to avoid clumping, gravy made using starch needs a slurry.

Gravy made with starch is clearer, darker, and shinier than gravy made using flour.

CORNSTARCH VS CORNFLOUR

Cornstarch and cornflour are the same thing. In North America cornstarch is the term commonly used where in Europe it is refereed to as cornflour.

POTATO STARCH AND OTHER STARCHES

This recipe calls for cornstarch just because it is the most common. However, you can use potato starch or any other starch you have on hand.

POTATO STARCH VS POTATO FLOUR

Potato flour is made from whole peeled potatoes, cooked, dried, and ground into a fine, beige-colored powder. 

Potato starch, on the other hand, is “washed” out of crushed potatoes, then dried to a fine, bright-white powder.

Potato flour is great for adding moisture and flavor to breads while potato starch is the right choice for gravy.

WHAT IS A ROUX

A roux is equal parts flour and fat cooked together until it reaches a specific color.

Rouxs have been used in French cooking for hundreds of years to thicken sauce.

The flour is added to the melted fat or oil on the stove top, blended until smooth, and cooked to the desired color. 

A roux can be white is used for country gravy, blond for classic gravies, or brown is used in gumbo and jambalaya. 

The lighter the roux the more thickening power it has.

Once the roux is the desired color liquids like stock are added.

WHAT IS A SLURRY

Slurries are commonly used in Asian cooking and Chinese-American cuisine. It is used to make sauces needed for recipes like Beef Broccoli and Pepper Steak.

A slurry, like a roux, is used to thicken gravies, sauces, stews, and soups. However, unlike a roux it is added at the end of the recipe.

It is a combination between corn starch or potato starch and water and provides a silky texture. 

While it is less common, slurries can be made out of flour.

HOW TO USE FLOUR AND STARCH

If you want both the benefits of the flour and the starch you can use both.

To do this, use 2 tablespoons of flour and drippings to make a roux. After the stock is added, use one tablespoon of starch to make a slurry and slowly it to the sauce.

A slurry, like a roux, is used to thicken gravies, sauces, stews, and soups. However, unlike a roux it is added at the end of the recipe.

It is a combination between corn starch or potato starch and water and provides a silky texture. 

While it is less common, slurries can be made out of flour.

HOW TO USE FLOUR AND STARCH

If you want both the benefits of the flour and the starch you can use both.

To do this, use 2 tablespoons of flour and drippings to make a roux. After the stock is added, use one tablespoon of starch to make a slurry and slowly it to the sauce.

CAN IT BE MADE AHEAD OF TIME?

Yes. You can make this gravy a day or two before and simply reheat it shortly before you’re ready to serve.

HOW TO STORE

Once the gravy has cooled, place it in an air tight container. Keep up to 5 days in the refrigerator. 

HOW TO FREEZE

Once the gravy has cooled, place it in an air tight container or a resealable freezer bag. 

You can freeze gravy for up to 5 months. After that, it is still safe to eat but the quality begins to degrade.

HOW TO REHEAT

Gravy will thicken as it cools. When you reheat it out with additional stock until it is smooth and reaches your desired consistency again. 

Yield: 1 cup

Dairy Free Gravy Without Drippings

Dairy free gravy in a glass gravy boat on a white marble counter

This dairy free gravy is made without drippings but is full of rich flavor!

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons oil
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour or 1 tablespoon cornstarch or potato starch
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup stock

Instructions

    Using Flour

    1. Heat oil. Whisk in the flour and stir continuously for 1 minute.
    2. Slowly whisk in the broth/stock and cook until thickened.
    3. Mix in onion powder, garlic powder, and salt to taste.
    4. Remove from the heat. Serve while hot.

    With Gravy with Corn or Potato Starch

    1. Place starch in a bowl and slowly whisk in 1/4 cup of stock to make a slurry.
    2. Add stock to the pan. Whisk in the slurry and bring to a simmer.
    3. Mix in onion powder, garlic powder, and salt to taste.
    4. Once thick remove from heat and add salt to taste. Serve while hot.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

4

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 150Total Fat: 11gSaturated Fat: 1gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 10gCholesterol: 2mgSodium: 353mgCarbohydrates: 10gFiber: 0gSugar: 1gProtein: 2g

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